Home > Fulbright, Research > Three months already??

Three months already??


I can barely believe it, but it’s already been three months since we landed in Pittsburgh, so nearly a quarter of my Fulbright year has passed (some Fulbrighters are even getting ready to fly back home now!). I’m not sure quite where the time is going, but it seems to be some sinister plan to motivate me to get some work done before I head back to Birmingham. The quicker time passes, the harder I (‘m supposed to) work. Or something like that.

In any event, I figured that it would be helpful to make a post on what to expect when applying for a Fulbright, some hints and tips that I found helpful, and to pass on some of my ‘wisdom’ (such as it is) to anyone embarking on this road (you can also check out Mutual Understanding for the collective wisdom of this year’s Fulbright cohort).

1. Plan ahead

When I decided to start applying for the Fulbright, the deadline was in May and I found out about it in March. Not a great amount of time to get going with it, especially in the middle of teaching. So learn from my mistake and plan well in advance of the deadline. A good application can take several months to decide where you want to go, read through all the documentation, write out a proposal, pull together all the documentation you need, get feedback (more on this later), chase up references and so on. To maximise your chances, you really need to be thinking long-term, as in six months before the deadline. It sounds like a long time (it is), but it’s not something you can rush in an afternoon or over a weekend.

2. Plan ahead

In fact, this point is so important, it’s worth repeating twice. Plan ahead. You’ll thank me for it.

3. Make sure you know what is required of the application

I almost got lost in the amount of paperwork required in the application, so make sure you spend time going through the instructions and make a list of all the documentation and paperwork that you need to submit. This will include references, project plan, teaching plan (if your award is a mix of teaching and research), bibliography, passport picture, etc etc etc. You don’t want your application thrown out because you’ve forgotten item 1b)…

4. Have a clear plan of what it is you want to do

I can only speak for the Scholars Award (so for post-doctoral awards), but I’m sure it also applies to the post-grad awards as well: know what it is you want to do during your time in the States. Your proposal needs to be clear, concise, interesting, inspiring, and all those other buzzwords that people get excited about. What is it you hope to achieve during your time there. A timetable of intended work is really helpful to give you an idea of how your time will be spent, even if it doesn’t make it into your application pack.

5. Get feedback

You’re going to be spending a lot of time with this application. As such, your objectivity will fade and you won’t be able to see the wood for the trees. Having someone to proof-read your work, ask you questions about it and give you feedback on your application is really important. I know that part of my success in getting the Fulbright was down to having a friend read through and critique almost everything in my application before I submitted it. Things like spelling mistakes, punctuation errors, sentence fragments and so on are much easier for someone else spot, so take the time to find someone to help you out with this. Beer, dinner and other gifts are all appropriate ways of thanking your ‘reviewer’.

Tune in on Saturday for Part II, where I’ll talk about knowing your audience, ambassadorial skills and other important stuff!

The Social Linguist

(As ever, this is not an official Fulbright/US State Department blog)

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. December 15, 2012 at 12:14 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: