Home > Research, University life > Robert Lawson: Academic, lecturer, Fulbright scholar

Robert Lawson: Academic, lecturer, Fulbright scholar


After 10 long long months of waiting to get the go-ahead to publicise this, I’m pleased to be able to share that I am now the Fulbright Scottish Studies Scholar! This announcement is the culmination of nearly 18 months of blood, sweat and tears, with application deadlines, interview stress, visa worries, and a whole host of other unmentionables. Yesterday, I returned from a three-day orientation in London where our status as Fulbrighters was confirmed and we were told that we could share the news with all and sundry. I’ve wanted to blog about this for ages but because there were so many steps where we could fall down and the award be retracted (for various reasons, including not being approved by the Washington D.C. Fulbright Board, not getting approved for a visa, etc etc), we were told to hold fast and announce it once all the paperwork was signed off.

So, from September 2012, I’ll be heading off to the exotic climes of the University of Pittsburgh, PA where I’ll be working on turning the thesis into a book (or as I’m calling it, thesis 2.0), and the edited volume on sociolinguistics in Scotland. And brilliantly, UoP is where Scott Kiesling (my external examiner for my thesis) works, so I’ll be able to pick his brains about issues to do with language and masculinity, which is very exciting.

I have plans to write up a bunch of stuff over the next year or so, including application and interview process, what to expect at orientation, visa issues, culture shock, the book writing process, and the Fulbright experience more generally, some of which I wasn’t able to find out about elsewhere on the internet. I’ll try and keep a focus on the ‘sociolinguistics’ side of the blog, but there will also be a fair smattering of other stuff going in as well.

While what I’m about to say is normally reserved for the acknowledgements page, I’d just like to take this opportunity to publicly thank a few people who helped out with putting together the application form, preparing for the interview and generally keeping me on the straight and narrow as I went through the Fulbright process.

First off, Professor Fiona Robertson helped out with reading a draft of my application and offered some important guidance on writing for a non-specialised audience. This made me refine my thoughts and work on how to communicate my ideas to people outside sociolinguistics, and her guidance definitely helped me get past the first round.

Second, Mel Moore was key in helping me put together the teaching side of my application. He also did a bunch of mock interviews with me (and was very professional in doing so!), read my application more times than he probably would have liked to, and generally cajoled, encouraged and motivated me to keep on going. The application was definitely stronger for his input and I am immeasurably grateful for both his help and his friendship.

I don’t think that words will suffice to thank the last person on this list, my girlfriend, Rebecca Hering. From persuading me to apply in the first place, to being by my side every step of the way, to patiently listening to me go through (for the umpteenth time) my mock interview answers, to keeping me smiling when I thought that my chances were hopeless, she has been an inspiration and a constant source of love and support. This award is as much hers as it is mine.

– The Social Linguist

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